Lost Lake Trail

September 7, 2015 – This morning we were debating whether to hike to Exit Glacier or go to Lost Lake.  Our hosts said that both trails were beautiful, but if they could hike only one they would choose Lost Lake.  So Lost Lake it was.

The hike begins in a spruce rainforest.
Yes, spruce rainforests are a thing.

The trailhead is about 15 minutes outside of town, and there were already a few cars parked when we arrived around 9:30.  We were pleased that the weather was perfect – sunny, a bit cool in the morning, and warming up throughout the day.

For some reason, I think of Hawaii when seeing this scenery.
For some reason, I think of Hawaii when seeing this scenery.

The hike starts off through a spruce rainforest (no, I didn’t know there was such a thing) before passing treeline.  The trail follows the hillside, with views up and down the valley.  It also passes quite a few perfectly ripe and very sweet blueberry bushes (we stopped for a handful before continuing up the trail).  Once you reach the tundra there’s one final hill then a view of Lost Lake.  We opted to stop at the top of the hill rather than hike down to the lake, putting our total hike around 12 miles instead of 14 or more.

Because rainforest and tundra aren't enough, here's a grassy plain.
Because rainforest and tundra aren’t enough, here’s a grassy plain.

One word of warning – this trail is also used by mountain bikers who may or may not ride at near-reckless speeds around blind corners, and not announce their presence.  Yes, we did have to literally jump off the trail on two separate occasions.  Otherwise the rest of the hike was quite pleasant.

The lake is not lost any more.
The lake is not lost any more.

We had snacks on the trail, but were craving heartier food.  It was mid-afternoon by the time we returned to town and we wanted to try a new spot for lunch.  Chinooks Bar and Grill fit the bill.  We enjoyed our seafood while looking out over the water.

You get a great view of the return hike from the summit.
You get a great view of the return hike from the summit.

We followed the road south of Seward until we ran out of road at Lowell Point (it only took about 10 minutes of slow driving), and then parked at the Tonsina Creek parking lot.  After a quick view of the water and a short walk through the woods, we decided that we’d had enough excitement for one day and went back to the B&B to relax.

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